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Pinterest & Canvas: Sharing Made Easy

17 Jan

Funny, whilst Google Plus and Facebook are the media darlings duking it out for supposed primacy in mainstream social networking, there’s a few newish sites that are doing good work and with significantly less attention. I think they do a better job of sharing (to a point) than the two great behemoths as they’re more focused on the things human beings actually want / do. I’m going to highlight Canvas and Pinterest because I think they are two sides of a coin; the latter aimed at more of a mass audience and the former at the meme-loving hordes with a bit of a creative bent.

Sardonic sneering: implied.

First, Pinterest. Simple version: it’s a way of saving webpages you’ve visited.

Saving webpages: very easy, thanks.

I’ve used a variety of sites / applications for this kind of thing over the years. Delicious was my original place, but its links to Yahoo! always made it clunky and you’d often find yourself logged out and needing to remember passwords etc. But it worked, so it was good. Later came Evernote, which mixed the simple link-saving with some visual “clippings” of the webpage to remind you what it looked like, etc. As I started to post more and more to Twitter I found myself mentally relying on the fact I’d tweeted as a “store” of my links… only to realise that searching tweets was annoyingly tricky sometimes – and then Trunkly came along. All you had to do was log in with Twitter and there were all your links you’d posted, neatly searchable. And then Delicious bought Trunkly and they’re about to turn it off whilst they integrate it into Delicious. And that felt like a step backward. I want “simple” – push button, everything happily stored. So I took a look at a friend’s recommendation: Pinterest.

Pinterest lets you save webpages as collections of thumbnails with a short description. Example. You can create a board about anything. In the “About” tab you’ll see “Pin It Button” – go there, drag it onto your links bar, then every time you’re on a webpage you want to save, you just hit the button. It’ll ask you which board you want to put it on, then you can add an image from the page and a description (tip: highlight text on the page and it’ll automatically add it as the description, so no additional typing required). And that’s it.

I love the simplicity. If you see an entry posted by someone that you like, you can “like” it, share it, follow that particular board. Whilst you can follow people, the chances are you aren’t interested in everything they are; perhaps you share just one common interest – so you follow the board not the person.

When you consider the relative complexity of Google’s Circles in Google Plus – and the amount of time it takes to administer it all Pinterest beats it hands down. I save content because I want to – if anyone wants to share it with me then that’s fine, but because my primary behaviour is “I want to save this” not “I want to display this” or “I want to draw attention to (or market) this” it just feels much more intuitive.

In the last week I have watched as the activity levels have shot up. Somewhat unbelievably, Alexa ranks Pinterest at #34 in the US traffic rankings – considering it’s still in beta and you need to request an invite, that’s… astounding. And it’s not just the stereotypically male, geeky early-adopter types; there’s a real spread of gender and age in the people I’m seeing, far more than Google Plus has managed to date.

If you’re interested, here’s me btw.

Onto Canvas, then. This is also a site about sharing, but it also adds a couple of neat elements: (primarily) visual conversations and the ability to create content easily. I’ve long been a fan of the likes of 4Chan and B3ta,

It's still rude, but not as rude as 4Chan

image boards that allow users to post Photoshopped images, animated gifs and other links – and with a streak of free-minded, anti-censorship liberty thrown in. Both are beautifully NSFW, 4Chan markedly more so than B3ta. Both are chock-full of laughs, mind, if your brain is wired that way. They are probably my two favourite sites which have lasted over the years. Which says a lot, probably.

Why is Canvas a leap forward? Because in the 8+ years I’ve been on both I’ve hardly posted any images. I’m laughing, but I’m also in awe of the Photoshop / other tech skills involved. I don’t have the chops, so I “lurk” rather than create. You may have heard of the  “1% rule” that says that only 1% of people are regular creators of content and this certainly applied to me with these sites. But Canvas (which, by the way, was created by Chris Poole aka “Moot” who created 4Chan) makes it easy – if you see an image, you’re encouraged to “remix” it. Hitting that button opens up an image editor with brushes, text editors and more that even I can use. And suddenly, I have started creating more. It’s just what you want if you love “meme” culture and want to get involved. And unlike sites like memegenerator.net – which has its charms – it has a much more conversational flow to the content and the way things are posted.

But that’s not the whole picture. “Liking” content is done through “stickering” – you drag a sticker onto the image you like. And there’s different stickers for different emotions – the traditional “LOL,” a shocked face, a “wise words” sticker, and more. The more time you spend on the site the more stickers you get access to.

There's more to life than "Like"

Finding images you liked is easy, too, as you just have to go to the “stickered by you” page and everything you liked is saved there.

And this, frankly, is better than Facebook “Like.” Liking is fine, but it’s too simplistic. I don’t “Like” my friend’s status saying that they’re having a rough time; I may LOVE a particular picture; I might be inspired by a comment. But it’s all just “Like” and that just isn’t human enough. I want to comment without (always) having to write something; sometimes you just need to smile or grimace at someone, give them a pat on the back or a roguish slap on the cheek. Humans interact through expression as much as through words; Canvas gets this.

So, two entirely different sites but with a common theme: they understand your social behaviour better than the two giants that we all talk about constantly. Neither are anything like “Facebook Killers” (stupid idea) – they’re just healthy additions to online life. And Google Plus seems to be doing a good job of killing itself with no outside assistance.

Anyway, these two sites appear to have done more to enable the truly human sides of sharing that either of the giants in recent times. “Like” is too simplistic; Circles is too complicated and time-consuming. Enabling human behaviour is at the heart of what makes a good social site and these two do it in spades. Enjoy.

 

 

 

PS No, I’m not going to link to my stuff on Canvas ‘cos it’s rude.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 17, 2012 in Communities, Digital, Social Media

 

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